Howe Lineage

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THE FIRST AMERICAN GENERATION

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EDWARD HOWE (How) sailed on the Truelove from the port of London on September 21, 1635, arriving at the Massachusetts Bay Colony, near present-day Boston, in late November. Included on the Truelove’s passenger list were Edward Howe, husbandman (planter), age 60, Elizabeth Howe 50, Jeremie Howe 21, Sarah Howe 12, Ephraim Howe 9, Isack Howe 7, and Wm Howe 6. Daniel Wait Howe’s Howe Genealogies (Boston, New England Historical Genealogical Society, 1929), the bible of Howe genealogical study, includes an additional child, Joseph, born in England between Jeremiah (Jeremie) and Sarah, who was not included on the passenger list. He also suggests that there were probably children in addition to these.  The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-33 (retrieved from www.ancestry.com on Sept. 20, 2012) includes a first child, Daniel (born by about 1608), Jeremiah (born about 1614), Joseph (born about 1621), Sarah (born about 1623), Ephraim (born about 1626), Isaac (born about 1628), and William (born about 1629.)

This Howe family that traveled to America was from “Berkhamstead, county Herts,” according to Charles Edward Banks, Planters of the Commonwealth (Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co, Inc., 1972). Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire is a historic town just north of London.

Although Edward’s age varies by a decade from that on the passenger list, Spencer Percival Mead in Ye historie of ye town of Greenwich, county of Fairfield and state of Connecticut (New York: Knickerbocker Press, 1911, Retrieved from HeritageQuestOnline 9/16/2012) states that Edward was born about 1585 at Hatfield Broad Oaks, County Essex, England.   Essex County is just east of Hertfordshire (Herts on map), so it is plausible that he moved from Hatfield Broad Oaks to Berkhamsted at some time.

(Alternatively, Bobby Howe, in his Howe Family Tree on www.ancestry.com, states that Edward Howe was baptized June 12, 1573 at Ivinghoe, Buckinghamshire (“Bucks” on map), probably married about 1598, and a daughter Rebecca was baptized at Ivinghoe November 11, 1599.  He surmises that Edward had two wives prior to Elizabeth in order to have children spanning 29 years.  He states that a record of marriage exists for Edward (or Edmund) Howe and Elizabeth Marvill on October 10, 1632, at Watton-at-Stone, Hertfordshire.  Those wishing for more information about the family in England should note that there were several Edward and Elizabeth Howes, some who immigrated and some, no doubt, who stayed in England.  There was an Edward Howe of Watertown, Massachusetts, of whom much has been written.  There was also an Edward Howe in Lynn prior to the arrival of our Edward, and, like our Edward, he was also a deputy to the General Court.  There was an Edward Howe of Middlesex, England (London County on map.)  The records for each of them, and more, need to be untangled to confidently present an earlier history.)

John Winthrop

John Winthrop, Governor
Massachusetts Bay Colony 1630-1649
http://www.winthrop
society.com

The initial settlers of the Massachusetts Bay Colony arrived between 1628 and 1633. Some Howe’s were among them, but there are varying opinions about whether or not they were related to Edward.  Ye historie of ye town of Greenwich states that Daniel Howe, “who settled in Lynn, Mass., about 1630, removed to Southampton, L.I., and finally returned to England,” was a brother, rather than a son as suggested in The Great Migration Begins.

Edward and his family were part of “the Great Migration,” about 30,000 Puritans who crossed the ocean in little wooden boats between 1634 and 1642. Puritans wanted to “purify” the Church of England, and when William Laud became Archbishop of Canterbury in 1633, “the Church of England began to embrace beliefs abhorrent to Puritans: a focus on the individual’s acceptance or rejection of grace; a toleration of diverse religious beliefs; and an acceptance of ‘high church’ rituals and symbols,” per Campbell, Donna M. “Puritanism in New England.” Literary Movements. Dept. of English, Washington State University (3/21/2010 http://public.wsu.edu/~campbelld/amlit/purdef.htm. Retrieved 9/14/2012.

According to the Winthrop Society, “their motivation was religious, political, and economic. The British church and government was becoming insufferably hierarchical, tyrannical, and tax-hungry. Common resentment among the English people led soon to the English Revolution beginning in 1642, and eventually to the beheading of King Charles for treason in 1649…”

Lynn, Massachusetts

Lynn, Massachusetts
From John Foster’s New England 1677
http://www.artfixdaily.com

Meanwhile, Edward settled in Lynn, Massachusetts, where possible son or brother Daniel had lived since 1630.  Edward “was admitted freeman 8 Dec 1636. Evidently he was a man of much ability, of good report, and a highly respected citizen. He was chosen deputy to the General Court in 1638, and in the same year, his name appeared on the list of land-owners in Lynn, as having 210 acres,” according to the Howe Genealogies.In fact, the Old Town Book of Lynn (Retrieved from www.americanancestors.org 9/16/2012) states, “The committee appointed by the town to divide the lands, completed their task, and a book was provided, in which the names of the proprietors, with the number of acres allotted to each, were recorded.  That book is lost; but a copy of the first three pages has been preserved in the files of the Quarterly Court at Salem…”  Edward Howe appears on page 1, showing that he received “200 and ten” acres, under the heading “These lands following were given to the inhabitants of the town of Lynn, Anno Domini 1638.”

Boston ferry area

Approximate site today of Edward Howe’s death

Edward died suddenly in April 1639.  These words were recorded in John Winthrop’s journal, History of New England 1630-1649 (C. Scribner’s Sons, 1908), “One Mr. Howe, of Lynn, a godly man, and a deputy of the last general court, after the court was ended, and he had dined, being in health as he used to be, went to pass over to Charles-town, and, being alone, he was presently after found dead upon the strand, being there (as it seemed) waiting for the boat, which came soon after.”  See Blog Post dated May 19, 2013, for more details.

On May 22, 1639, Elizabeth was appointed by the General Court to administer Edward’s estate.  Elizabeth died January 25, 1672, according to Ye historie of ye town of Greenwich.

CHILDREN OF EDWARD & ELIZABETH HOWE:

DANIEL was assumed to be a son of Edward, born about 1608, by The Great Migration Begins.  It is likely that he was actually a brother to Edward (possibly with a different birth date), as other researchers suggest.  According to the Howe Genealogies (with relationship unspecified),  “Capt. Daniel Howe…was in Lynn, as early as 1630, only two years after the settlement of Boston and Salem.”  A Daniel How received 60 acres in the original 1638 land grant to those who “came over” and settled at Lynn.  The History of Lynn states, “Lieutenant Daniel Howe, brother of Edward, was admitted a freeman in 1634.  He was representative in five courts, and the first Lieutenant of the Artillery Company in 1638.  He was master of a vessel, and removed to New Haven.”  Ye historie of ye town of Greenwich states, “Daniel Howe, who settled in Lynn, Mass., about 1630, removed to Southampton, L. I., and finally returned to England.”

A story of one of Daniel’s assignments, related in the History of Lynn, gives us a glimpse into the times.  “The year of 1636 has been rendered memorable by the commencement of a great war with Sassacus, sachem of the Pequod Indians.  Some of his tribe had murdered a boats’ crew in Connecticut river, which induced the white people to take up arms.  On the sixteenth of June, Governor Vane directed Lieutenant Howe to have the military company at Lynn in readiness; and in August a requisition was made for ninety men from Massachusetts, who were divided into four companies, one of which was commanded by Captain Turner.  They had orders to put to death all the red men on Block Island, and to demand the murderers of the Pequods, with a thousand fathom of wampum, and some of their children as hostages.  On arriving at Block Island, they destroyed seven canoes and sixty wigwams, with many acres of corn, and killed one Indian, the rest having fled.  They then went to Pequod, now New London, where they burnt the canoes and wigwams, and killed thirteen Indians.  They returned on the fourteenth of September.”

JEREMIAH (Jeremie) was born in England about 1614.  At age 21, he sailed from London on the Truelove with his parents and siblings, arriving at Boston September 21, 1635.  According to the Howe Genealogies, he married Elizabeth and probably had two children in Lynn:  Zachariah and Nathaniel.  They moved to New Haven, Connecticut, where he was a lot owner by 1643.  He changed his church membership from Lynn to Centre Church in New Haven in 1645.  He took the oath of fidelity in New Haven on May 2, 1647.  More children were born in New Haven:  Elizabeth, Bathsheba, Jeremiah, Joseph, John, and Ebenezer.  He probably kept a public inn.  Records of the Colony and Plantation of New Haven, from 1638 to 1649 (Hartford.  Printed by Case, Tiffany, and Co., for the editor, 1857) state the following:

“Jeremiah Howe hath libertie from the courte to sell strong watter by pints or quarts or other small quantities, so that he suffer it not be drunke in his house, but sell it to ye townes folke or stranges out of his house, provided allso that he haue due respect to any suspicious persons and unseasonable times, that all disorder maye be prevented; this to continew till the courte find some inconvenienc.”

Per the Howe Genealogies, in 1670, when the town was settled, he moved to Wallingford, Connecticut.  His will, dated November 15, 1677, states that he was a mariner about to sail for the Barbadoes.  Jeremiah died in New Haven January 16, 1690.  His widow Elizabeth died January 23, 1695/6.  (Note that, for many years, dual dating was used during January, February, and March as a transition from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar.)

JOSEPH was born in England about 1621.  He was not on the Truelove passenger list with his parents and siblings, but he did appear as a passenger arriving in Lynn, Massachusetts, in 1640.  On November 25, 1641, the Salem Quarterly Court records state that he agreed to go to sea.  “We were the first boat that went out, and had the first of fishing.  Then other boats went, but the fourth had little or no employment,” per the Howe Genealogies.  He married Elizabeth Needham and had one child:  Elizabeth Howe.  He died before January 8, 1650/51, when an inventory of his estate was taken.  His widow later married Samuel Hart.

SARAH  was born about 1623 in England.  At age 12, she sailed on the Truelove with her parents and siblings, arriving at Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1635.  There is no further record of her, according to The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-33 (retrieved from www.ancestry.com on Sept. 20, 2012).

EPHRAIM was born in England in 1626.  At the age of 9, he sailed from London on the Truelove with his parents and siblings, arriving at Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1635.  According to Ye historie of ye town of Greenwich, Ephraim settled in New Haven, Connecticut, in 1644.  He married Anne Haugh, born in 1630 in Bristol, England, per the Howe Genealogies.  Children, born in New Haven, were Ephraim (April 3, 1653), Sarah (January 25, 1654), Mary (January 17, 1656/7; died young), Samuel (September 1, 1658), Daniel (January 4, 1663), Isaac (August 22, 1666), Abigail (April 23, 1668), Esther (November 18, 1671), and Mary (December 8, 1674).

Although the History of Lynn (Retrieved from www.ancestry.com Sept. 21, 2012) attributes the following story to an Ephraim Howe who was the son of Daniel, the Howe Genealogies and The Shipwreck of Capt. Ephraim Howe,” Essex Antiquarian, Vol. 2, 1898, pp. 187-88 attributes it to Edward’s son Ephraim.  The story, as shown below, was included in Archibald Duncan’s The Mariner’s Chronicle: containing narratives of the most remarkable disasters at sea, such as shipwrecks, storms, fires, and famines (New Haven, G.W. Gorton, 1834; digitized by the Library of Congress. Retrieved from http://openlibrary.org September 22, 2012.)

Ephraim Howe died September 8, 1680, with an estate of 218 pounds.  His widow died January 28, 1711/12.  Her estate was insolvent.

ISAAC forms part of the direct lineage of this family.  Scroll down to “The Second Generation” to read his story.

WILLIAM was born in England about 1629.  He appears on the Truelove passenger list with his parents and siblings, traveling as a six-year-old from London to Boston in 1635.  According to the Howe Genealogies, “As he was only 10 years of age when his father died, he probably lived with his mother in Lynn until he was married” to Mary Farmer.  William and Mary “appeared in Concord as early as 1657, and perhaps earlier.  It has been supposed that he came with wife Mary from Chelmsford to Concord.”  Their children were Samuel (born October 14, 1654), Daniel (died June 4, 1657), Sarah (born July 17, 1658; died January 21, 1659), Hannah (born December 3, 1660; died November 24, 1683), William (born January 25, 1663, died February 1, 1663), and Mary (born July 19, 1665; died October 16, 1666.)  William was a farmer.  He died at Concord, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, on April 26, 1675, according to Edmund West, comp. Family Data Collection-Deaths, 2001 (Retrieved from www.ancestry.com Sept. 23, 2012.)  Again from the Howe Genealogies, “An inventory of his estate was taken 26 April 1676, amounting to 35-01-10 pounds, and his widow was granted letters of administration 20 June 1676.  She probably married second, 10 April 1677, Christopher Woolie of Concord, as his second wife.  She died 26 Dec. 1695.”

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THE SECOND AMERICAN GENERATION

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ISAAC HOWE (How) was born about 1628 in England.  At the age of 7, he sailed from London to America on the Truelove, along with his parents and siblings, arriving in the Boston area  in 1635.  Since he was just 10 or 11 at the time of his father’s death, he probably lived with his mother in Lynn for several years–until 1649 or later.   From the Howe Genealogies, “He probably married in Lynn but the name of his wife is unknown, and so far, we have no data concerning his early life, but it is quite probable that he was the Isaac Howe who settled at Greenwich, Ct., about 1686.  According to the Greenwich Town Records, we find that a three acre lot was laid out to Isaac Howe, 26 Feb. 1686.  It is quite probable that he had a family prior to that date, of which we find no record, and thus far we have the name of one child, but it is quite probably that there were others.”

It is very possible that Isaac’s move from Lynn, just north of Boston, to Greenwich, Connecticut, took him along the Lower Post Road, which was first used in 1678.  The road traveled through Rhode Island and followed the shoreline of Long Island Sound to Greenwich.  Today’s U.S. Route 1 is about the same route.

Isaac died in Greenwich, Connecticut, in 1688, per Ye historie of ye town of Greenwich.

CHILD OF ISAAC HOWE & UNKNOWN WIFE:

NATHANIEL forms part of the direct lineage of this family.  His story is directly below, under “The Third Generation.”

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THE THIRD AMERICAN GENERATION

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NATHANIEL HOWE was born in Lynn, Massachusetts, about 1650.  He married Elizabeth Bowers, sister of John Bowers, who lived in Greenwich.  Two children are known, but there were probably others, per the Howe Genealogies.  It appears that his children were born in New Haven.  The Howe Genealogies suppose that Nathaniel lived in New Haven, Connecticut, after he lived in Lynn and before he moved to Greenwich.

Nathaniel was included among about 50 legal voters out of a population of about 300 in Greenwich, Connecticut, in 1688, according to A History of the Town of Greenwich, Connecticut, (retrieved from www.ancestry.com Sept. 27, 2012.)

According to Ye historie of ye town of Greenwich, also in 1688, Nathaniel Howe was among a group of seven men who protested against Rev. Jeremiah Peck, minister of the First Society of Greenwich, for refusing to baptize their children.  (The controversy was over whether infants should be baptized or whether people should wait until they were old enough to choose baptism for themselves.)  In spite of the protest, the congregation voted to allow Rev. Peck to remain.  However, a year later, he was dismissed for having “given offence” to many.

Nathaniel died June 29, 1692, in Greenwich.  An inventory of his estate was taken July 25, 1692.

CHILDREN OF NATHANIEL & ELIZABETH HOWE:

ISAAC forms part of the direct lineage of this family.  Scroll down to “The Fourth Generation” to read his story.

JOHN was “born probably in New Haven, Ct., between 1675 and 1685; married 27 July 1710, Comfort Finch of Stamford, Ct.” per the Howe Genealogies.  Comfort was the daughter of Abraham Finch.  John and Comfort settled in Greenwich, Connecticut, and had the following children:  Ebenezer (born about 1711), Nathaniel (born June 27, 1713), Hannah (born April 3, 1716), John (born June 4, 1719), and Sylvanus.

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THE FOURTH AMERICAN GENERATION

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ISAAC HOWE was born September 20, 1669, probably in New Haven, Connecticut.  He married Elizabeth Waterbury on June 1, 1702, in Greenwich, Connecticut, as recorded in the Barbour Collection of Connecticut Town Marriage Records.

Arrival of the Winthrop Colony
by William F. Halsall
http://www.wikipedia.com

Elizabeth Waterbury was descended from one of the earliest families in America.  Her great-grandparents, William and Alice Waterbury, lived just six miles from John Winthrop in Suffolk County, England, and sailed with him on the Eagle, later named the Arabella (the flagship of the Winthrop fleet), to Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1630.  Their eldest son, second child, John (Elizabeth’s grandfather) accompanied them on the journey.  They settled in Watertown, Massachusetts.  Although the parents are supposed to have returned to England, John remained in America and married Rose Lockwood.  Records from 1639 show that John was an “inn holder” or hotel keeper in Watertown.  On October 15, 1646, he sold his property in Watertown and moved to Wethersfield and shortly thereafter to Stamford, Connecticut, where he became one of the largest estate holders and one of the most prominent citizens.  The fifth and last child of John and Rose was David Waterbury, Elizabeth’s father.  David fought in King Phillips War and achieved the rank of Lieutenant.  He received land in Stamford for his service in this war.  David was married twice, first to Hannah Newman and second to Sarah Weed.  The second child of David and Hannah was our Elizabeth Waterbury, born January 19, 1684.  (Waterbury information from Waterbury, Grace Adelle.  Jonathan Waterbury genealogy:ancestry and some of the descendants of Jonathan Waterbury of Nassau New York (1766-1825) with identical matter concerning the origin of the Waterbury family and its early history in Europe and America and notes of the descendants of Joseph Waterbury (1778-1829) of Nassau, N.Y. and Roger Morey (1610-1669) of Providence, R. I.  Oswege, N.Y.  Published for the family for private distribution by Palladium-Times, 1930.)

According to the Howe Genealogies, Isaac and Elizabeth Howe moved to Stamford, Connecticut, in 1714.  At the General Assembly of Connecticut in 1722, John was appointed and commissioned Ensign of the first company or trainband of Stamford, Connecticut.  (A trainband was a band of men trained locally as a militia.)  Nine children were born to Isaac and Elizabeth between 1703 and 1725.  Although as yet undocumented, many researchers believe that Elizabeth died February 29, 1733, at age 49.  Isaac’s death is listed in the Stamford Vital Records as occuring May 7, 1733, in New York.

CHILDREN OF ISAAC AND ELIZABETH HOWE:

NATHANIEL forms part of the direct lineage of this family.  Scroll down to “The Fifth Generation” to read his story.

SARAH was born October 8, 1704, and died December 24, 1704, per the Howe Genealogies.

ELIZABETH  was born March 16, 1708, in Greenwich, Connecticut, per the Barbour Collection of Connecticut Town Birth Records.  She married Lt. James Slason (Slauson, Slawson) in Greenwich in 1730.  The Howe Genealogies lists their children as Elizabeth (born October 28, 1731), Isaac (born October 17, 1733), James (born January 6, 1736), Sarah (born May 15, 1738), Peter (born April 21, 1740), and Bowers (born June 23, 1742.)  (Note that Bowers was the maiden name of Isaac Howe’s mother, and this became a popular family first name.)  Elizabeth died in Stamford, Connecticut, on October 21, 1758.  James died on December 16, 1759, also in Stamford.

ISAAC is shown in the Greenwich Vital Records as being born there January 8, 1711.  He married Abigail Webb in Stamford on August 15, 1734, but Abigail died July 30, 1735.  They had no children.  On February 2, 1736, he married Keziah Mead, who had been born in Greenwich, Connecticut, on February 10, 1707.  The Howe Genealogies lists the children of Isaac and Keziah as Abigail (born February 22, 1738), Sarah (born June 16 1739 and died February 16, 1740), Sarah (born June 9 1741), Kezia (born February 23, 1743), Elizabeth (born January 22, 1745 and died September 20, 1810), Rachel (born in 1747 and died young), and Isaac (born February 11, 1749.)  Isaac died in Greenwich on October 8, 1779, and Kezia died November 19, 1808.

EPENETUS was born in Stamford, Connecticut, in 1717.  The Stamford Vital Records (Barbour Collection) show that Epenetus was married to Mary Mead (Meed, Meade) by the Reverend Mr. Todd in Greenwich on February 7, 1739/40.  The Howe Genealogies tells us that “they lived for a short time in Stamford, then moved to South Salem, Westchester Co., N.Y.  They were admitted to the church in South Salem, 12 July 1752.  6 of their children were baptised in South Salem, 12 July 1752.”  Children listed in the Stamford Vital Records (Barbour Collection) are Epenetus (born January 9, 1740/41), Isaac (born October 17, 1742), Mary/Polly (born December 8, 1744), and Ester (born September 16, 1746).  Per the Howe Genealogies, “there is said to be a son Ebenezer, but we find no record of his birth, and his name does not appear among the children that were baptized 12 July 1752.  He probably died young.”  Children for whom the Howe Genealogies found baptismal records are Rachel (baptized July 12, 1752), Martha (baptized July 12, 1752), Gideon (baptized July 14, 1754), Jesse (baptized in Norfolk, Connecticut, April 6, 1757), Sarah (baptized in South Salem, New York, June 24, 1759), David (baptized November 15, 1761), and Ireneus (baptized July 22, 1764.)  Epenetus died in South Salem on January 16, 1772/73.

BOWERS is listed in the Stamford Vital Records (Barbour Collection) as being born there on October 6, 1718.  He died at sea as a young, unmarried man.

DAVID was born in Stamford, Connecticut, on January 14, 1720/21, according to the Stamford Vital Records (Barbour Collection.)  Also here is the listing of his marriage by the Reverend Mosses Mather to Rebecca Whiting on March 20, 1745/46.  Rebecca was the daughter of Joseph and Abigail Whiting of Stamford.  The birth of David and Rebecca’s children were recorded in the Stamford Vital Records as follows:  Jacob (born October 16, 1746), Abigail (born September 3, 1750), Bowers (born August 8, 1752), Rebeckah (born April 7, 1755), and Elizabeth (born September 29, 1760.)  The Howe Genealogies and other sources list an additional child, Sarah, born about 1748.  David died in April 1795.

EBENEZER is listed in the Stamford Vital Records (Barbour Collection) as being born there on August 4, 1723.  These Stamford records also show his marriage to Mary Brown on September 4, 1753.  Ye historie of ye town of Greenwich considers this to be Ebenezer’s second marriage, although no name or information is provided about a possible first wife, and it states that Ebenezer and Mary moved to Bedford, New York, in Westchester County.  Their two known children, listed in both the Howe Genealogies and Ye historie of ye town of Greenwich, are Nathan (born in April 1724) and Ebenezer (born in January 1757.)

JAMES was born December 18, 1725, as shown in the Stamford Vital Records (Barbour Collection).  The Howe Genealogies state that he married Sarah Waring of Norwalk, Connecticut, on August 20, 1752, and they probably lived in or near Darien, Connecticut.  Their children were Sarah (born May 26, 1753), James (born April 29, 1759), and Elizabeth (born April 22, 1763.)  James died in November 1779.  Sarah died October 31, 1807.

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THE FIFTH AMERICAN GENERATION

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NATHANIEL HOWE was the first son of Isaac and Elizabeth Howe, born June 12, 1703 in Greenwich, Connecticut, as shown in the birth records for that town.  The Stamford Vital Records (Barbour Collection) show that he was married to Sarah Bates “the evening following the 5th day of Nov. 1729, by Rev. John Davenport.”  Sarah was the daughter of Lieutenant Samuel and Sarah Bates of Stamford.  She was born February 23, 1704/05, according to the birth records for Stamford.  The same birth records list the births of six of their children.

Stamford/Greenwich to Canaan
A map of the colonies of Connecticut and Rhode Island, divided into counties and townships. 1758.
http://magic.lib.uconn.edu

Per the Howe Genealogies, Nathaniel and Sarah moved to Canaan, Litchfield County, Connecticut, about 1739, although the actual date may have been a couple years later, since Hannah was born in Stamford in 1740/41 and there is no record in Stamford of the birth of Isaac in 1743.  Sarah died October 21, 1778, according to the Canaan Vital Records (Barbour Collection.)  Nathaniel died in 1795, per the Howe Genealogies.

CHILDREN OF NATHANIEL AND SARAH HOWE:

NATHANIEL, Jr. was born in Stamford, Fairfield County, Connecticut, on March 7, 1729/30 and is listed in the town birth records there.  After the family moved to Canaan, he married Eleanor Warner there on November 10, 1768.  The Canaan town records show that Eleanor was from Suffield, north of Hartford and about 43 miles from Canaan.  The Howe Genealogies list Elizabeth as their child and suggest that there were other children.

SAMUEL was born March 20, 1732, in Stamford, Fairfield County, Connecticut, and is listed in the town birth records there.  The Howe Genealogies state that Samuel married Mary Turner on September 29, 1763, and, indeed, this marriage is recorded in the Canaan Vital Records (Barbour Collection) with the groom listed as Samuel Howe, Jr.  Nathanial and Sarah clearly had a son named Samuel, but the title “junior” raises a question of whether this Samuel Howe is indeed their son.  If so, after Mary’s death on December 15, 1766, Samuel, Jr. married Lydia Pain on June 30, 1768, in Canaan.  Children of Samuel and Mary, listed in the Canaan Vital Records (Barbour Collection), are Josiah (born August 7, 1763) and Abigail (born September 10, 1764).  Abigail’s birth shows her father as Samuel, Jr.  Children of Samuel and Lydia, listed in the Canaan Vital Records (Barbour Collection) are Bowers (born March 26, 1769), twins Lois and Lydia (born June 12, 1771), James (born March 26, 1775, with father listed as Samuel 2nd), and Baits Hait (born October 15, 1776, with father listed as Samuel, 2nd.)

SARAH was born in Stamford on April 19, 1734, according to the Stamford Vital Records (Barbour Collection.)  The Norfolk Vital Records (Barbour Collection) show that she married Samuel Turner of Norfolk, Litchfield, Connecticut, on December 26, 1754.  Norfolk is about eight miles from Canaan, where Sarah’s family lived at the time.  These records also list the births of their children:  Daniel (born March 21, 1756), Elizabeth (born December 3, 1757), Hannah (born June 23, 1759), Baits (born October 30, 1760), Uriah (born December 4, 1762), Samuel (born February 8, 1766), Solomon (born October 20, 1767), Isaac (born October 16, 1769), Nathaniel (born March 11, 1772), and Josiah (born October 18, 1775.)

ELIZABETH was born June 17, 1736, in Stamford, Fairfield County, Connecticut, per the Stamford Vital Records (Barbour Collection.)

URIAH was born October 8, 1738, in Stamford, Fairfield County, Connecticut, and is listed in the Vital Records (Barbour Collection) for that town.  He served in the French and Indian War and died at Albany, New York, on September 1, 1758, of wounds received at Ticonderoga on July 6, 1758, according to Ye historie of ye town of Greenwich and the Howe Genealogies.

HANNAH is listed in the Stamford Vital Records (Barbour Collection) with a date of birth of February 23, 1740/41, although the Howe Genealogies show her place of birth as Canaan.

ISAAC forms part of the direct lineage of this family.  Read his story below, under “The Sixth Generation.”

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THE SIXTH AMERICAN GENERATION

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ISAAC HOWE was born on December 16, 1743, after his parents and siblings had moved to Canaan, Litchfield, Connecticut.  The Canaan Vital Records (Barbour Collection) show that he married Mary Cande on November 22, 1764, although this information is also included in the marriage records of Middletown, Middlesex, Connecticut, as follows:  “Isaac Howe of ——- & Mary Conda, November 22, 1764.”  Mary Cande (Conda, Candee) was born in Canaan on June 10, 1744, according to the Howe Genealogies.  However, her parents, Zaccheus and Desire Roberts Cande appear to have lived their entire lives in Middletown, Connecticut, nearly sixty miles from Canaan, so it is probable that she was born there instead.   Mary Howe, fourth daughter of Zaccheus, was remembered in her father’s will, when it was probated at Middletown April 8, 1772.

Charlemagne
(Charles the Great)

Charlemagne’s Empire

Mary Cande may have brought a venerable pedigree to the family.  If Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne’s Descendants, Volume III is accurate, her lineage has been traced back to Charlemagne, King of the Franks, Emperor of the West, who was born April 2, 742, and died January 28, 814.

www.wikipedia.com (retrieved October 24, 2012), describes Charlemagne as follows, “Called the ‘Father of Europe,…Charlemagne’s empire united most of Western Europe for the first time since the Roman Empire. His rule spurred the Carolingian Renaissance, a revival of art, religion, and culture through the medium of the Catholic Church. Through his foreign conquests and internal reforms, Charlemagne encouraged the formation of a common European identity.   Both the French and German monarchies considered their kingdoms to be descendants of Charlemagne’s empire.”  According to Pedigrees, Mary Cande’s paternal grandmother was Sarah Lane (1678-1737) who married Zaccheus Cande (1674-1743.)  Sarah’s mother, Hannah Browne (1651-1711) married Isaac Lane (1639-1711.)  Hannah’s father was Nathaniel Browne (abt. 1625-1658.)  Nathaniel’s father was Percy Browne (abt. 1602-?)  Percy’s father was Sir William Browne.  And so it continued through many generations back to Charlemagne.

Isaac and Mary Howe lived in Canaan, Connecticut, for several years, and their children were probably born there, according to the Howe Genealogies.  Uriah was born in 1766, Philar in 1769, and their last child, Mary, was born in 1771.

Some time after this, they moved 150 miles north to the Green Mountain region of Vermont.  Clement Ferdinand Heverly’s Pioneer and Patriot Families of Bradford County, Pennsylvania (Towanda, Pa.: Bradford Star Print, 1913) says that “Isaac Howe was one of the ‘Green Mountain’ patriots who supplied the American army in the vicinity of Bennington and Ticonderoga with lead which he drew to camp in an ox-cart.”  The capture of Fort Ticonderoga took place in 1775, and the battle at Bennington took place in 1777.  Therefore, if the above sources are accurate, Isaac and Mary would have moved to Vermont between 1771 and 1775.

Flag of the Green Mountain BoysWikipedia.com

Flag of the Green Mountain Boys
Wikipedia.com

“The original Green Mountain Boys were a militia organized in what is now southwestern Vermont in the decade prior to the American Revolutionary War.  They comprised settlers and land speculators who held New Hampshire titles to lands between the Connecticut River and Lake Champlain, an area then known as the New Hampshire Grants, that is now modern Vermont.  New York was given legal control of the area by a decision of the British crown and refused to respect the New Hampshire titles and town charters. Although a few towns with New York land titles…supported the change, the vast majority of the settlers in the sparsely populated frontier region rejected the authority of New York…Headed by Ethan Allen and members of his extended family, they were instrumental in resisting New York’s attempts to control the territory, over which it had won de jurecontrol in a territorial dispute with New Hampshire.  When these disputes led to the formation of the Vermont Republic in 1777, the Green Mountain Boys became the state militia. Some companies served in the American Revolutionary War, including notably when the Green mountain boys led by Ethan Allen captured fort Ticonderoga at lake Champlain on

Isaac Howe’s Revolutionary War Grave Marker
Photo by B. Sugden

May 10th, 1775, the 1775 invasion of Canada, and 1777 battles at Hubbardton and Bennington.  Following Vermont’s admission to the Union in 1791, the original organization essentially disbanded,” according to www.wikipedia.com(retrieved Oct. 27, 2012.)

The first U.S. federal census was conducted August 2, 1790.  At that time, there was an Isaac How living in Hubbardton, Rutland County, Vermont, with a household consisting of 2 males and 1 female over the age of 16.

The 1800 census shows Isaac How living in West Haven, Rutland, Vermont, with a household of 1 male and 1 female over the age of 45.  Sons Uriah and Philo are listed with households of their own.  There also was a John How living in West Haven.  His relationship, if any, is unknown.

Isaac was active in civic affairs.  His name appears often in the town records for West Haven, Vermont, where he held such offices as Selectman, Grand Juror, and Surveyor of Highways in the early 1800’s.  See Vermont, Town Clerk, Town Records 1732-2005, Rutland, West Haven at www.familysearch.org.  (Retrieved Nov. 3, 2012)

According to the Howe Genealogies, he “was a ‘well-to-do’ man in West Haven, but lost his property by becoming surety for another.”

Isaac Howe moved from Connecticut to Vermont
and Vermont to Pennsylvania
Map from http://www.mapsofpa.com

Isaac and Mary moved from West Haven to Orwell, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, in February, 1808, per Pioneer and Patriot Families of Bradford County.  The Howe Genealogies tell us that Isaac’s sons Uriah and Philar went with them.  Indeed, son Philar and his wife Sarah sold their property in West Haven on January 17, 1807, per their bill of sale, no doubt in preparation for the move.  (Daughter Mary remained in West Haven, according to the Howe Genealogies.)

From Ye historie of ye town of Greenwich, we learn that Isaac built the first frame house in Orwell, and from the Howe Genealogies, “the farm which he…purchased, has always remained in the possession of some of his descendants, and in 1897 it was owned by his great grandson Henry Howe.”

Isaac How is listed in the 1810 census in Orwell Township, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania.  His household contains several people in addition to Mary and himself.  This may be son Uriah’s family, among others.  Other son “Philori” How is listed with a household of his own, from Tri-Counties Genealogy and History by Joyce M. Tice, www.joycetice.com.  (Retrieved Nov. 11, 2012)

Darling Cemetery
Orwell, Pennsylvania
Photo by B. Sugden

From the same source, Isaac Howe is found in the 1812-13 list of taxables (all males over 21 years of age and females owning property) at the time of formation of Bradford County.  Listed along with him are Uriah, “Philo,” and Philar’s son James.

Grave of Isaac & Mary Howe

Ron Vargason at the grave of his 4th great grandparents,
Isaac & Mary Howe
Photo by B. Sugden

Mary died October 14, 1812.  Isaac died August 21, 1825.  Both are buried in Darling Cemetery, Orwell, Pennsylvania, not far from the home they shared.  Their grave continues to honor Isaac’s Revolutionary War service.

CHILDREN OF ISAAC AND MARY HOWE:

URIAH was born October 10, 1766, in Canaan, Connecticut. per the Howe Genealogies, and moved to Vermont with his parents and siblings.  He purchased a parcel of land in West Haven, Vermont, from his father on November 12, 1798, perhaps in preparation for his marriage. From the Howe Genealogies, we learn that he married Sally Nash, born near Plymouth, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, on December 6, 1799.  In the 1800 census, conducted August 4, Uriah and Sally are shown in West Haven, Rutland County, Vermont, both as ages 26-44.  Father Isaac and brother Philar and a John How are also there.  They had a daughter, Sally, who was born October 13, 1800, according to the Howe Genealogies.  Wife Sally died at West Haven, Vermont, on October 14, 1800.

The Howe Genealogies indicate that he married second, Sally Barker about 1801.  They had two children born in West Haven:  Perley (born May 12, 1804) and Earl (born August 22, 1806).  They moved, along with Isaac and Philar, to Orwell, Pennsylvania, in February 1808.  Another child, Lucy, was born in Orwell on July 11, 1808.  Uriah is not shown on the 1810 census for Orwell, but it is probable that he and his family lived with Isaac and Mary at the time.  Uriah is shown on the 1812-13 Orwell Township Taxables list.

Bradford County Tax Assessment Records compiled by Sarah Edsell, 2010, Bradford County Historical Society, 109 Pine Street, Bradford, Pennsylvania, include the following records for Uriah:

1813:  8 improved land + 2 improved land (value $204), 70 unimproved land + 20 unimproved land (value $28), 2 cows (value $22). Total value $254.

1814:  Deduct 1 cow $11.  8 improved land + 2 improved land (value $204), 70 unimproved land + 20 unimproved land (value $28), 2 cows (value $22). Total value $243.  Tax due $1.82.

1815: 8 acres improved (value $64), 4 acres improved (value $20), 70 acres unimproved ( value $100), 20 acres unimproved (value $20). Total value $244.  Tax due $1.83.

1816:   8 acres improved (value $64), 4 acres improved (value $20), 70 acres unimproved (value $140), 20 acres unimproved (value $20), 2 oxen (value $35), 2 cows (value $22).  Total value $299.  Tax due $1.49.

1818:  6 acres improved (value $42), 6 acres improved (value $24), 50 acres unimproved (value $100).  Total value $166.  Tax due $ .83.

1820:  2 acres improved (value $14), 14 acres improved (value $56), 32 acres unimproved (value $64), 32 acres unimproved (value $32), 1 cow (value $8).  Total value $174.  Tax due $ . 87.


www.
findagrave.com
Photo by
Lyle Rockwell

1826:  10 improved acres (value $80), 10 improved acres (value $40), 20 unimproved (value $40), 41 unimproved (value $41), house (value $20), 2 cows (value $20).  Total value $241.

The 1830 census shows Uriah in Smithfield, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, although www.joycetice.com lists him in Orwell.  He is assumed to be the 70-80 year-old male, and Sally is assumed to be the 60-70 year-old female.  Sally passed away December 4, 1830.

The 1840 census shows son Earl living in Orwell with his family, which includes a 70-80 year-old male, assumed to be Uriah.  Per the Howe Genealogies, Uriah died at Orwell on July 15, 1844.

PHILAR forms part of the direct lineage of this family.  Scroll down to read his story, under “The Seventh Generation.”

MARY was born March 26, 1771, probably in Canaan, Connecticut, according to the Howe Genealogies, which also tell us that Mary “did not remove with her father to Orwell, Pa., but remained in West Haven, Vt.”  Nothing else is known of her at this time.

————

THE SEVENTH AMERICAN GENERATION

————

PHILAR/PHILO HOWE/HOW was born in Canaan, Litchfield County, Connecticut, on either April 6, 1769, or August 6, 1769.  Both dates are listed on various pages of the Howe Genealogies.  As a child, he moved to Vermont with his parents and siblings.

Per the Howe Genealogies, Philar married Sally Grant, of whom little is known.  The 1800 U.S. census shows Philo How in West Haven, Rutland County, Vermont, with a household of one male and one female, each 26-44 years of age, and two males and one female, all under 10.  The children can safely be assumed to be sons James and Isaac and daughter Hannah.  Philar’s father Isaac, brother Uriah, and a John How and their families were also in West Haven.  The Town Records of Rutland, West Haven, 1732-2005, www.FamilySearch.org (Retrieved Nov. 3, 2012) show that Philar How served as a grand juror in West Haven on February 23, 1805.  Philar and Sarah How sold their property in West Haven to John Shaw of Benson for a sum of $300 on January 17, 1807.

They moved from West Haven to Orwell, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, in February 1808, along with father Isaac and brother Uriah and their families.  Philori How is listed in the 1810 U.S. census for Orwell Township, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, with a household of 1 male and 1 female 26-45, 2 males and 1 female under 10, 1 male 10-16, 1 male 16-26, and 1 male over 45.  The children are assumed to be the complete family:  James, Isaac, Hannah, Horatio, and John.  The identity of the male 16-26 and male over 45 cannot be assumed at this time.  Philo Howe, along with Isaac, James, and Uriah, is included in the 1812-13 list of taxables for Orwell Township at the time of formation of Bradford County.  (www.joycetice.com.  Retrieved Nov. 18, 2012.)  Bradford County Tax Assessment Records, compiled by Sarah Edsell, 2010, Bradford County Historical Society, 109 Pine Street, Bradford, Pennsylvania, include the following records for Philar:

1813:  12 improved acres (value $244), 2 unimproved acres (value $22), 2 oxen (value $42), 1 cow (value $12).  Total value $320.

1814:  12 acres improved land + 2 acres improved land (value $244), 74 acres unimproved land + 74 acres unimproved land (value $82), 2 cows value $42), 1 cow (value $12).  Total value $380.  Tax due $2.85.

1815:  12 acres improved land (value $90), 2 acres improved land (value $10), 100 acres unimproved land (value $200), 48 acres unimproved land (value $48), 1 horse (value $15), 2 oxen (value $40), 2 cows (value $22).  Total value $431.  Tax due $3.23.

1816:  12 acres improved (value $90), 2 acres improved (value $10), 100 acres unimproved (value $200), 48 acres unimproved (value $48), 2 oxen (value $35), 1 horse (value $10).  $399.  Tax due $1.99.

1817:  10 acres improved land (value $70), 60 acres improved land (value $40), 30 unimproved (value $60), 12 unimproved (value $12), 1 horse (value $10), 2 oxen (value $35), 3 cows (value $33).  Total value $260.  Tax due $1.30.

1818:  10 acres improved (value $70), 10 acres improved (value $40), 30 acres unimproved (value $60), 12 acres unimproved (value $12), 1 cow (value $10), property of James Howe $85, property of Isaac Howe 2nd $80.  Total value $357.  (Philar purchased 50 unimproved acres from James Howe for $85 and Isaac Howe’s land for $80 during 1818.)  Tax due $1.78.

1819:  10 improved (value $70), 10 improved (value $40), 95 unimproved (value $180), 47 unimproved (value $47), 1 cow (value $11).  Total value $348.  Tax due $1.74.

1820:  12 acres improved (value $84), 13 acres improved (value $52), 68 acres unimproved (value $136), 69 acres unimproved (value $69), 1 cow (valoue $10).  Total value $351.  Tax due $1.76.  The 1820 census lists Philo How in Wysox Township, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, with a household of 1 male 16-18, 1 male 16-26, 1 male to 45, and 2 females 16-26.

Philo How was a member of Union Lodge No. 108, Free and Accepted Masons, Towanda, Pennsylvania, from May 18, 1815, to February 20, 1823, as shown in James H. Codding.  A History of Union Lodge No. 108, Towanda, PA, 1899, available from the collection of the Bradford County Historical Society.

The Howe Genealogies states that Philar left Orwell, Pennsylvania, “in 1821, and is supposed to have settled in Ohio or Illinois.”  The 1830 census for Ypsilanti Township, Washtenaw County, Michigan, include Isaac and Horatio Howe.  Living with Isaac were a male 60-70 and a female 50-60.  Are these people Philar and Sally?  No further information about them has surfaced to date.

CHILDREN OF PHILAR AND SALLY HOWE:

JAMES is listed in the Howe Genealogies as a son of Philar and Sally.  He was born in 1793 in Vermont and moved to Pennsylvania with his family in 1808.  While barely old enough to be included, James Howe was listed on the 1812-13 tax rolls for Orwell Township at the time of its formation along with his father, uncle, and grandfather.  The Bradford County Tax Assessment Records compiled by Sarah Edsell, 2010, available from the Bradford County Historical Society, 109 Pine Street, Towanda, Pennsylvania, provide the following information about James:

1815:  Single freeman.  Value $100.  Tax due $ .75.

1816:  Single freeman.  Value $100.  Tax due $ .50.

1817:  35 acres unimproved land (value $70), 15 acres unimproved land (value $15), single freeman (value $100).  Tax due $ .92.

1818:  35 acres unimproved land (value $70), 15 acres unimproved land (value $15).  A note in the tax record states that he removed to Ohio, and his land was transferred to Philar Howe.  Brother Isaac also transferred his land to his father at this time.

It is likely that James and Isaac did move to Ohio, since Mary, probabably a child of Isaac, was born there about 1826.  Ohio records for the family have not yet been located.  There were several people named James Howe in various areas of the country during the years he would have lived, and the adventurous nature of this generation makes it difficult to assume which one he might have been.  Although widely claimed as the son of Peter and Orinda Fuller Howe, one must wonder, based on the names of his children, whether the James Howe found in the 1840, 1850, and 1860 census records for Elkland, Tioga County, Pennsylvania, might not be this James Howe instead.  He married Malvina Retan and had children named Philo/Philar, Peter, Albert, Joseph B., Isaac, Levi, Adeline, and Hellen.

ISAAC is listed in the Howe Genealogies as a son of Philar and Sally.  According to the Portrait and Biographical Album of Fayette County, Iowa, Chicago, Lake City Publishing Company, 1891 (Retrieved from http://archive.org/details/portraitbiogra00lake December 1, 2012), Isaac was born in Poultney, Rutland County, Vermont, on October 11, 1795.

He moved, along with his parents and siblings, to Orwell, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, in February 1808.  Bradford County Tax Assessments for Orwell show the following information for Isaac:

1817:  30 acres unimproved land (value $60), 20 acres unimproved land (value $20), single freeman (value $100).  Tax due %1.90.

1818:  30 acres unimproved land (value $60), 20 acres unimproved land (value $20), 1 horse (value $30).  Tax due (on horse) $ .15.  A note in the tax record shows that his land was transferred to Philar Howe.

He married Sarah J. Beers, according to the Portrait and Biographical Album of Fayette County, Iowa, page 598.

A note in the Family History Files at the Bradford County Historical Society states that he and Sarah (and brother Horatio) went to visit parents in Ohio.  The 1850 census shows Mary A. Mortell and her daughter living in Isaac’s household.  She was born in Ohio about 1826 and may have been a child of Isaac and Sarah.

The 1830 census shows Isaac and brother Horatio, and their families, living in Ypsilanti Township, Washtenaw County, Michigan.  Isaac’s household consisted of 1 male and 1 female under 5, 2 females 5-10, 1 male and 1 female 20-30, 1 male 30-40, 1 female 50-60, and 1 male 60-70.  Isaac was counted here again in the 1834 Michigan census.  At least some of their children were born here:  Julia A. about 1827; Isaac about 1830; Hannah E. March 10, 1833; and Charles 1835.

At the time of the 1850 census, 59-year-old Isaac and 53-year-old Sarah were living in York, DuPage County, Illinois, with children Julia A. (23), Hannah E. (19), Isaac (20), Charles (15), and 24-year-old Mary A. Mortell and 3-year-old Mary E. Mortell, who was born in Illinois.  Isaac was a farmer with real estate valued at $2,000.

In 1852, they moved to Iowa, settling in Windsor Township, Fayette County, per the Portrait and Biograpical Album of Fayette County, Iowa, page 598.  On April 3, 1854, in the first Windsor Township election, Isaac was elected clerk of the election and township assessor, per Past and Present of Fayette County, Iowa, Indianapolis, Ind.: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1910; www.ancestry.com 2005 (Retrieved December 2, 2012.)  The 1856 Iowa census shows them here.  In the household are 60-year-old Isaac, Senior; Sarah (no age listed); Charles (21); Mary E. Martel (9);  Isaac (26) and his wife Esther (18).

The 1860 federal census placed them in Westfield, Fayette County, Iowa.  Isaac’s real estate was valued at $2,000 and his personal property at $800.  In the household were Isaac (age 64), Sarah (age 62), “Martle” Martel (age 13), and Eliza Curtiss (age 8).

Sarah died April 2, 1870, and Isaac died February 12, 1878, according to the Portrait and Biographical Album of Fayette County, Iowa, page 598.  The Iowa Gen Web project, http://iagenweb.org (Retrieved December 2, 2012) lists slightly different death dates:  March 17, 1869, for Sarah and November 4, 1877, for Isaac.  Both are buried in Grandview Cemetery, Westfield Township, Fayette County, Iowa.

HANNAH is listed in the Howe Genealogies as a child of Philar and Sally Howe.  It can be assumed that she was born in Vermont prior to 1800.  The 1800 census for West Haven, Rutland County, Vermont, shows Philo’s household with 2 boys and 1 girl under 10.  These children can be assumed to be James, Isaac, and Hannah.

She moved with the family to Orwell, Bradford County, Pennsylvania in February, 1808.  She is listed in the Bradford County Tax Assessments for Orwell Township, compiled by Sarah Edsell, for the years 1818, 1819, and 1820.  She had one cow, valued at $12 in 1818, $11 in 1819, and $10 in 1820.  She paid taxes of $ .06 in 1818 and $ .05 in 1819 and 1820.  Nothing more is known of her.

HORATIO forms part of the direct lineage of this family.  Click here to read his story.

JOHN is listed in the Howe Genealogies as a child of Philar and Sally Howe.  Nothing is known of him.

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